Summer 2017 in the Canadian Maritimes

Adventures of David, Jelynne and Eva


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VIDEO: A Day in Monaco

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Exploring Monaco


On Friday we set off on the train from Nice-Ville to Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo.

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Coat of arms of Monaco: Two Catholic Christian Friars Minor hairy, bearded and wearing shoes, each of them holding a raised sword, standing on a scroll charged with the motto “Deo Juvante” “With God’s Help” It remembers on the 8.1.1297, when Francesco Grimaldi, disguised as a monk, decapitated the guardians and conquered the hill of Monaco.

Coat of arms of Monaco: Two Catholic Christian Friars Minor hairy, bearded and wearing shoes, each of them holding a raised sword, standing on a scroll charged with the motto “Deo Juvante” “With God’s Help” It remembers on the 8.1.1297, when Francesco Grimaldi, disguised as a monk, decapitated the guardians and conquered the hill of Monaco.

Photos

"Is that our train?" Waiting for our train to Monaco from Gare Nice-Ville.

“Is that our train?” Waiting for our train to Monaco from Gare Nice-Ville.

Gare Nice-Ville, Nice. On our way to Monaco.

Gare Nice-Ville, Nice. On our way to Monaco.

Gare Nice-Ville, Nice, France

Gare Nice-Ville, Nice, France

Sculpture of Juan Manuel Fangio. A tribute to him after winning the 1955 Monaco Grand Prix in his Mercedes Benz.

Sculpture of Juan Manuel Fangio. A tribute to him after winning the 1955 Monaco Grand Prix in his Mercedes Benz.

Casino de Monte-Carlo (photo taken from a bumpy tourist train that was in motion!)

Casino de Monte-Carlo (photo taken from a bumpy tourist train that was in motion!)

Entrance to the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Entrance to the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Sea-side walk as we approach the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Sea-side walk as we approach the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

David and Jacques Cousteau at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

David and Jacques Cousteau at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Eva mesmerized by the displays at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Eva mesmerised by the displays at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

"Two fish!" Eva mesmerized by the displays at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

“Two fish!” Eva mesmerised by the displays at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Cabinet of Curiosities at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Cabinet of Curiosities at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Sculpture of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Sculpture of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

View of the Mediterranean from near the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

View of the Mediterranean from near the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Bump-bump-bump-bump... shark! - Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Bump-bump-bump-bump… shark! – Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Huang Yong Ping's Giant Octopus at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Huang Yong Ping’s Giant Octopus at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

"The yellow one is my favourite!" Eva mesmerized by the displays at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

“The yellow one is my favourite!” Eva mesmerised by the displays at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Strawberry milkshake at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco... relief from the heat!

Strawberry milkshake at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco… relief from the heat!

Invented in 1774 and constructed out of wood, the first submarine is on display at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Invented in 1774 and constructed out of wood, the first submarine is on display at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Invented in 1774 and constructed out of wood, the first submarine is on display at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Invented in 1774 and constructed out of wood, the first submarine is on display at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The mega smile of the Megaladon. Jaws over 2 metres wide and high, reassembled using real fossilised teeth that are millions of years old by the artist Philippe Pasqua.

The mega smile of the Megaladon. Jaws over 2 metres wide and high, reassembled using real fossilised teeth that are millions of years old by the artist Philippe Pasqua.

The mega smile of the Megaladon. Jaws over 2 metres wide and high, reassembled using real fossilised teeth that are millions of years old by the artist Philippe Pasqua.

The mega smile of the Megaladon. Jaws over 2 metres wide and high, reassembled using real fossilised teeth that are millions of years old by the artist Philippe Pasqua.

This monumental exhibition room, the Curiosity Cabinet, in the Museum of Oceanography, displays the rarest marine objects are revealed in spectacular fashion.

This monumental exhibition room, the Curiosity Cabinet, in the Museum of Oceanography, displays the rarest marine objects are revealed in spectacular fashion.

Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Eva exploring the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Eva exploring the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

Overlooking the stunning Bay of Monaco.

Overlooking the stunning Bay of Monaco.

Exploring the streets of Vieile Monaco-Ville in the evening.

Exploring the streets of Vieille Monaco-Ville in the evening.

A statue of Grimaldi disguised as a monk with a sword under his frock before the Prince's Palace of Monaco.

A statue of Grimaldi disguised as a monk with a sword under his frock before the Prince’s Palace of Monaco.

The Prince's Palace of Monaco is the official residence of the Prince of Monaco. Built in 1191 as a Genoese fortress, during its long and often dramatic history it has been bombarded and besieged by many foreign powers.

The Prince’s Palace of Monaco is the official residence of the Prince of Monaco. Built in 1191 as a Genoese fortress, during its long and often dramatic history it has been bombarded and besieged by many foreign powers.

Overlooking the spectacular Port Hercules in Monaco from near the Prince's palace.

Overlooking the spectacular Port Hercules in Monaco from near the Prince’s palace.

One of the many eclectic boutiques in Vieille Ville Monaco.

One of the many eclectic boutiques in Vieille Ville Monaco.

Lèche-vitrine at one of the many eclectic boutiques in Vieille Ville Monaco.

Lèche-vitrine at one of the many eclectic boutiques in Vieille Ville Monaco.

No shortage of Italian-influenced restaurants in Vieille Ville Monaco.

No shortage of Italian-influenced restaurants in Vieille Ville Monaco.

Before boarding the train back to Nice, we at at this genuine Italian restaurant called Pinocchio in Vieille Ville Monaco.

Before boarding the train back to Nice, we ate at this genuine Italian restaurant called Pinocchio in Vieille Ville Monaco.

David enjoying an Italian pizza called Napoli. La Pizza au feu de fois.

David enjoying an Italian pizza called Napoli. La Pizza au feu de fois.

Looking for a restaurant for dinner in the streets of Vieille Ville Monaco.

Looking for a restaurant for dinner in the streets of Vieille Ville Monaco.

An incredible espresso from the restaurant, Pinocchio, in Monaco-Ville. I shared the biscuit with Eva!

An incredible espresso from the restaurant, Pinocchio, in Monaco-Ville. I shared the biscuit with Eva!

Along the Bay of Monaco

Along the Bay of Monaco

Colourful buildings of Vieille Ville Monaco.

Colourful buildings of Vieille Ville Monaco.

La Poste Monaco

La Poste Monaco

Colourful buildings of Vieille Ville Monaco.

Colourful buildings of Vieille Ville Monaco.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame-Immaculée (Cathedral of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception), also known as Saint Nicholas Cathedral (name of the old church which was demolished in 1874),[1] Monaco Cathedral (French: Cathédrale de Monaco), is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Monaco in Monaco-Ville, Monaco, where many of the Grimaldis were buried, including Grace Kelly and more recently, Rainier III.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame-Immaculée (Cathedral of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception), also known as Saint Nicholas Cathedral (name of the old church which was demolished in 1874),[1] Monaco Cathedral (French: Cathédrale de Monaco), is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Monaco in Monaco-Ville, Monaco, where many of the Grimaldis were buried, including Grace Kelly and more recently, Rainier III.

We boarded the tourist train for a 30-minute tour of Monaco.

We boarded the tourist train for a 30-minute tour of Monaco.

The Prince's Palace of Monaco is the official residence of the Prince of Monaco. Built in 1191 as a Genoese fortress, during its long and often dramatic history it has been bombarded and besieged by many foreign powers. Since the end of the 13th century, it has been the stronghold and home of the Grimaldi family who first captured it in 1297. The Grimaldi ruled the area first as feudal lords, and from the 17th century as sovereign princes, but their power was often derived from fragile agreements with their larger and stronger neighbours.

The Prince’s Palace of Monaco is the official residence of the Prince of Monaco. Built in 1191 as a Genoese fortress, during its long and often dramatic history it has been bombarded and besieged by many foreign powers. Since the end of the 13th century, it has been the stronghold and home of the Grimaldi family who first captured it in 1297. The Grimaldi ruled the area first as feudal lords, and from the 17th century as sovereign princes, but their power was often derived from fragile agreements with their larger and stronger neighbours.

A beautiful evening view of Port Hercules on the walk back to the train station (on the other side of the bay!).

A beautiful evening view of Port Hercules on the walk back to the train station (on the other side of the bay!).

At the Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo awaiting our train back to Nice.

At the Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo awaiting our train back to Nice.

At the Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo awaiting our train back to Nice.

At the Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo awaiting our train back to Nice.

At the Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo awaiting our train back to Nice.

At the Gare de Monaco-Monte-Carlo awaiting our train back to Nice.

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A Day in Antibes

On Wednesday (August 5, 2015), we took the train from Nice to Antibes.

Antibes is a picture-postcard seaside town that hugs the shores of the Mediterranean between Nice and Cannes. It’s 16th-century ramparts cluster around the Le Vieil Antibes of narrow cobbled streets, the flower and vegetable market and the old port. Antibes grew from the ancient Greek trading port of Antipolis More recently, in the 20th century, Antibes became the favorite town for, among many other artists and writers, Picasso, Nicolas de Staël and Max Ernst and the novelist, Graham Greene.

Today it’s famous as one of the Mediterranean’s premier luxury harbours, where sleek white, multi-million dollar mega yachts bob at anchor in the sheltered harbor near Vauban’s Fort Carré. Greater Antibes takes in Antibes, the gorgeous private villas of Cap d’Antibes, the technopolis of Sophia Antipolis to the north, and glitzy modern Juan-les-Pins, internationally known for its summer jazz festival. More information here.

Antibes-Juan-les-Pins Quick Facts

  • 80,000 inhabitants
  • Second largest town on the Côte d’Azur
  • Located between Nice and Cannes
Gare de Nice-Ville. Nice-Ville is the main railway station in Nice, France.

Gare de Nice-Ville. Nice-Ville is the main railway station in Nice, France.

SNCF (Société nationale des chemins de fer français; “National society of French railways” or “French National Railway Company”) is France’s national state-owned railway company and manages the rail traffic in France and the Principality of Monaco. SNCF operates the country’s national rail services, including the TGV, France’s high-speed rail network. Its functions include operation of railway services for passengers and freight, and maintenance and signalling of rail infrastructure.

Eva's first trip on a train!

Eva’s first trip on a train!

Minutes after disembarking the train in Antibes, Eva discovers yet another fountain to play in!

Minutes after disembarking the train in Antibes, Eva discovers yet another fountain to play in!

Eva overlooking Port Vauban in Antibes.

Eva overlooking Port Vauban in Antibes.

Port Vauban is a French yachting harbor located in Antibes on the French Riviera. Originally a natural harbor in use since before the Roman Empire, the port was fortified by Sébastien Le Prestre, Seigneur de Vauban, later Marquis de Vauban, King Louis XIV’s military engineer.

Port Vauban now serves as the home of the Yacht Club d’Antibes and is the largest marina (in terms of total tonnage of the boats and yachts moored there) in the Mediterranean Sea. Some of the world’s largest and most lavishly appointed yachts have Port Vauban as their home port, including Russian oil businessman Roman Abramovich’s 86 m Ecstasea and his gift to fellow Russian businessman Eugene Shvidler (Le Grand Bleu). Co-founder of Microsoft Paul Allen’s yacht Octopus is a regular visitor to the harbor. In the early part of the 20th century, Port Vauban also accommodated numerous seaplanes and a seaplane manufacturer.

As of 2012, typical rates for a berth in Port Vauban are between €1m to €1.4m.

Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

View from the ramparts of Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

View from the ramparts of Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

David capturing the beauty of Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

David capturing the beauty of Plage de la Gravette from the ramparts, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette is perhaps the most beautiful of the Antibes public beaches, discreetly tucked away behind the ramparts at the end of the port. With fine, white sand and luminescent water, this idyllic beach attracts a loyal crowd of locals that just wouldn’t be seen at any other beach.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France. Nice is across the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels) in the hazy distance.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France. Nice is across the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels) in the hazy distance.

Beautiful windows lace the streets of Vieil Antibes.

Beautiful windows lace the streets of Le Vieil Antibes.

The Musée Picasso, formerly the Château Grimaldi at Antibes, is built upon the foundations of the ancient Greek town of Antipolis.

Musée Picasso, Antibes, France. Viewed from the ramparts at the back of the museum.

Musée Picasso, Antibes, France. Viewed from the ramparts at the back of the museum.

Musée Picasso, Antibes, France.

Musée Picasso, Antibes, France.

The Picasso Museum occupies the Château Grimaldi in Antibes.

The Picasso Museum occupies the Château Grimaldi in Antibes.

Musée Picasso, Antibes, France.

Musée Picasso, Antibes, France.

Being "flaneurs" through Vieil Antibes.

Being flaneurs through Le Vieil Antibes.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Would you like some sand? I have lots! Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Would you like some sand? I have lots! Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Dad, here's your new boat! Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

Dad, here’s your new boat! Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

Entering Le Vieil Antibes, Antibes, France.

Entering Le Vieil Antibes, Antibes, France.

Okay, so where are we? :)

Okay, so where are we? 🙂

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Overlooking Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Overlooking Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Stone fountain at Antibes' Place National.

Stone fountain at Antibes’ Place National.

We had an amazing lunch at an Irish pub called The Hop Store.

We had an amazing lunch at an Irish pub called The Hop Store.

Enjoying lunch in Antibes at the Irish pub called The Hop Store.

Enjoying lunch in Antibes at the Irish pub called The Hop Store.

The colourful Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Platea d'Antibes, Antibes, France.

The colourful Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Platea d’Antibes, Antibes, France.

Le Marché Provençal, Antibes, France. The bust of General Championnet in front of the market hall. Championnet died of cholera in Antibes in 1800 at the age of 38. It was noted in the Revolutionary armies in Germany and during the Italian campaign led by Bonaparte.

Le Marché Provençal, Antibes, France. The bust of General Championnet in front of the market hall. Championnet died of cholera in Antibes in 1800 at the age of 38. It was noted in the Revolutionary armies in Germany and during the Italian campaign led by Bonaparte.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Platea d'Antibes, Antibes, France.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Platea d’Antibes, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

Plage de la Gravette, Antibes, France.

View from the ramparts at the Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

View from the ramparts at the Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

View of a few of the yachts from the ramparts at the Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

View of a few of the yachts from the ramparts at the Port Vauban, Antibes, France.

After having housed a temple and then a chapel in Roman times, a fortified tower was built at Saint-Jaume which was to be completely destroyed in the 17th century. A few decades later, the Bastion Shipyard was built here, where Captain Cousteau’s famous ship Calypso was kitted out. The shipyard closed in 1985. Destroyed because it had fallen into disuse, the building gave way to a vast area highlighting the famous fortified remains of the curtain wall, beautifully renovated. Today, this area features the Nomade sculpture by Catalan artist Jaume Plensa. More information here.

The Nomade at the Bastion St. Jaume, Antibes, France.

The Nomade at the Bastion St. Jaume, Antibes, France.

The Nomade at the Bastion St. Jaume, Antibes, France.

The Nomade at the Bastion St. Jaume, Antibes, France.

The Nomade at the Bastion St. Jaume, Antibes, France.

The Nomade at the Bastion St. Jaume, Antibes, France.

The beautiful cobble-stoned streets of Le Vieil Antibes.

The beautiful cobble-stoned streets of Le Vieil Antibes.

The beautiful cobble-stoned streets of Le Vieil Antibes.

The beautiful cobble-stoned streets of Le Vieil Antibes.

Returning to Nice from Antibes on an SNCF train.

Returning to Nice from Antibes on an SNCF train.


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Return from Paris to Nice

Today, I returned from the rainy and coolish Paris for the hot and sunny Côte d’Azur. I remembered reading about a colourful street near the Gare de Lyon (from where the TGV train to Nice was departing). However, I wasn’t sure where it was; I just knew that it was near the train station in. So, instead of taking the Metro all the way to the Gare de Lyon Metro stop, I got off the train at Bastille and walked to the station with the hope that I would find it. Along the way, I discovered Rue Cremieux, the colourful street that I had hoped to see.

I learned that the street was named after Adolphe Cremieux (Nimes, April 30, 1796 – Paris, February 10, 1880), lawyer and politician, member of the Government of National Defence. He was also the author of a famous decree of 1870 which gave French nationality to Jews in Algeria.

Rue Cremieux has been a pedestrian street since 1993 and is paved and lined with small houses with three floors and colorful facades.

Rue Crémieux, Paris, France - colourful buildings, July 27, 2015

Rue Crémieux, Paris, France – colourful buildings, July 27, 2015

Rue Crémieux, Paris, France - colourful buildings, July 27, 2015

Rue Crémieux, Paris, France – colourful buildings, July 27, 2015

A great day to be a cat on Rue Crémieux, colourful buildings, July 27, 2015

A great day to be a cat on Rue Crémieux, Paris, France – July 27, 2015

Only 2 minutes up the street, I arrived at Gare de Lyon.

Paris-Gare de Lyon is one of the six large mainline railway stations in Paris, France. It handles about 90,000,000 passengers every year, making it the third busiest station of France and one of the busiest of Europe.

The Paris-Gare de Lyon was built for the World Exposition of 1900 and the architecture used in the construction of this train station is a classic example of the architecture of that time period. The station has been modernized to accommodate the high-speed TGV trains that whisk travellers throughout France.

Gare de Lyon as seen from Rue Traversière, Paris, France - July 27, 2015

Gare de Lyon as seen from Rue Traversière, Paris, France – July 27, 2015

Entrance to Hall 1 of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France - July 27, 2015

Entrance to Hall 1 of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France – July 27, 2015

Hall 1 of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France - July 27, 2015

Hall 1 of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France – July 27, 2015

TGV train inside the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France - July 27, 2015

TGV train inside the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France – July 27, 2015

Hall 1 of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France - July 27, 2015

Hall 1 of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, France – July 27, 2015

 

From Rail Europe:

There is one word to describe TGV. Fast! The world speed record holder, it zips from city to city at up to 322 kph (201 mph). With Paris as its hub, this high-speed French network interconnects throughout Europe making it an attractive alternative to the plane.

If we had to find another word to describe the TGV, it would have to be “often”. Because every day 450 trains crisscross the network, offering you a wide choice of journey times.

The TGV is France’s technological gem, constantly improving comfort and performance while also keeping sight of the planet’s well-being.  In fact, eco-mobility is at the heart of the TGV experience. From the aerodynamic design of the lines to the manufacturing of the trains, each step is carefully researched to minimize the impact on the environment. Even our drivers are trained to ‘drive economically’ (power off when going downhill, adapting the speed to rail grip-reducing electricity consumption by a third). It continues throughout, with light fixtures that use low-energy light bulbs, air conditioning that adapts to the number of travelers, waste that is compacted and waste water that is recycled.