Summer 2017 in the Canadian Maritimes

Adventures of David, Jelynne and Eva

The Hopewell Rocks, also called the Flowerpots Rocks or simply The Rocks, are rock formations caused by tidal erosion in The Hopewell Rocks Ocean Tidal Exploration Site in New Brunswick.


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A Marine Wonder of the World: Hopewell Rocks

We arrived in Hopewell Cape, on the Bay of Fundy, this afternoon and checked into our hotel. It’s conveniently located only 1.7 kilometres from the Hopewell Rocks.

The Hopewell Rocks, also called the Flowerpots Rocks, is one of the Marine Wonders of the World and is the site of some of the World’s Highest Tides. These rock formations are caused by tidal erosion in The Hopewell Rocks Ocean Tidal Exploration Site and they stand 40–70 feet tall.

Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick

The Hopewell Rocks is a place to pause…a place to appreciate a remarkable story interwoven through time, tide, and the intricacies of nature. These are the highest tides in the world. And they happen twice a day….every day.

Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick

The interpretive staff at the park (called the Hopewell Rocks Provincial Park) are are very friendly and they are located at key areas to answer any questions you may have. In addition to the opportunity to walk on the ocean’s floor, the park features two sandy beach areas at either end of the park and a number of well-marked walking trails.

Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick

What visit to New Brunswick could be complete until you’ve witnessed the natural wonder of the Bay of Fundy and learned the fascinating story behind its world-famous tides? The Hopewell Rocks is a magical place for your imagination to play…the only place where you can become a part of that story.

Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick


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Percé Rock, Gaspé Peninsula

Most of the footage for this 4K drone video was captured at dawn. That means that I had to get up just before sunrise, which was just before 4:30 a.m. It was definitely worth it – not just for the early morning light but to see the birds and sea life come to life. I hope I was able to cinematize the magic of Percé Rock in the morning within these 3 min 56 sec.

 


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Our Walk to Percé Rock

Percé Rock on the Gaspé Peninsula in Canada is a narrow, interestingly shaped island butte measuring over 400 metres in length. Its seaward side has a four-story-high natural arch.

A spit of land connecting Percé Rock with the mainland appears when the tide goes out. This creates a dry, easy walkway for tourists to see the monolith up close. As we discovered, it’s well worth the walk down to the water and across the land bridge. The water seemed to retreat from about 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. which allows visitors to walk over to the Rock.

Some visitors walk all the way to the far end of Percé Rock. Those who contemplate doing it should bear in mind that rocks do fall, the footing on the fallen rocks can be challenging, and the tide will eventually come in.

Rocher Tête d'indien, located in the village of Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, à Pointe-Saint-Pierre, Québec, Canada.


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Local Legend Near Percé: Rocher Tête d’indien

On a day trip from Percé, Jelynne, Eva and I discovered the Rocher Tête d’indien, which is located south of the village of Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, in Pointe-Saint-Pierre.

Rocher Tête d'indien, located in the village of Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, à Pointe-Saint-Pierre, Québec, Canada.

Rocher Tête d’indien, located in the village of Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, à Pointe-Saint-Pierre, Québec, Canada.

Legend has it that white men from Europe on a tall ship have one day dropped anchor in a cove located not far from Plate Island facing Pointe-Saint-Pierre. As they went to the shore, to get supplies of fresh water and wild fruits, they saw a young Indian princess busy in the forest entertaining young children. The men from elsewhere captured her and brought her to their distant country.

This sad face, whose gaze is riveted to the cliff, is that of her lover, who is tirelessly awaiting her return, resolved in her grief to turn her back to the sea as long as she does not bring back her beloved.

Rocher Tête d'indien, located in the village of Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, à Pointe-Saint-Pierre, Québec, Canada.


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Video: Meet (or not) the Whales of Percé, Québec

We had the best intentions of seeing whales (even just one!) but we had no such luck. However, we did have some fascinating views of Percé Rock. This limestone Rock is 438 metres long by 88 metres high and was formed on the bottom of the ocean bed during the Devonian period (375 million years ago).

It was well worth the attempt and I’d recommend the cruise just for a different perspective of the area. Who knows, maybe you’ll have the chance, if you go on this cruise, to feel the spray of a fin whale or a humpback as it blows nearby.

Centre d’Art Marcel Gagnon is located is located on the St. Lawrence River in Sainte-Flavie in Gaspésie.


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Centre d’Art Marcel Gagnon

As we were making our way to Sainte-Anne-des-Monts in Québec, we discovered a beautiful auberge, which is also an art gallery: the Centre d’Art Marcel Gagnon.

In 1984, the painter, sculptor and writer transformed a modest cottage into an art gallery that transformed itself over time and its creativity. Since its inception, it has become a centre where art, sea and the good table enchant the people of the region and tourists of passage.

The indoor and outdoor gallery, that features the sculptures of the “Grand Rassemblement,” is located on the St. Lawrence River in Sainte-Flavie in Gaspésie. We admired more than 80 life-size statues emerge from the sea. After enjoying dinner at their restaurant, the statues transformed as we explored the outdoor exhibit as a result of the outdoing tide and the vibrant sunset.

The Big Apple, Colborne, Ontario.


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All Things Apple

Our first stop today was at The Big Apple in Colborne, home of the world’s biggest apple and where homemade apple pies and apple bread are made and baked right in front of you! The Big Apple hosts more than 500,000 people each year.

Eva loved The Treat Shop, of course, and walking up the stairs to the top of the apple. If we had more time, we would have explored the outdoor activities which included mini putt, shuffleboard, bocce ball, ing Pong and the kids’ train ride.